Bergen Survival Tips

Late last month to early this month, I went on a trip to Bergen, Noway for a conference (you can check out my posts on Bergen here, here and here). And here are some of the things I learned from my recent trip to Bergen:

  1. It pays to do research before boarding a plane to a city you are not familiar with. A lot of people, myself included, put too much trust on Google Maps and smart phone data to help me find the way. Traveling from Bergen Airport to wherever your Bergen hotel is, however, one of the instances where the smart phone data/Google Maps fail. According to Google Maps, there are no public transportation available; so it recommends taking a renting a car, taking a cab, or walking. Online research, however, shows that an airport shuttle exists. And, if you flew SAS, an SAS shuttle for cheaper is also available. You can check out details for Flybussen here. If you download the Flybussen app, you can get your tickets for cheaper. Round trip tickets are also cheaper than one way tickets. If you have an international student card or a senior citizen card, you can get a discount.
  2. In fact, unless you’re driving or walking, skip Google Maps altogether. A guide to Bergen’s public transportation can be found here. When you click on “Timetables and Maps”, you can input your origin and destination and find the timetables for busses.
  3. IT RAINS IN BERGEN! 200 days in a year, according to rumors. And when it rains, it pours. So bring a sturdy rain jacket. Bring umbrellas too (even when Norwegians in Bergen do not use umbrellas!). And make sure you packed your rain boots. Bergen is pretty up north; wind-chill factor + getting rained on is definitely, definitely, definitely not ideal.
  4. According to Trip Advisor, there are only 5 cheap awesome places to eat in Bergen. I’ve checked out three of these places and two of the three I checked out were not cheap at all! So if you’re on a budget, I recommend going to Inside Burger Rock Café (@ Vaskerelvsmauet 7, 5014 Bergen). It’s average Scandinavian food price, at least for someone who has lived in Copenhagen for 11 months.
  5. If you’re from Scandinavia, this last tip will not work for you; but if you’re not, hooray! Non-Scandinavian citizens can get tax rebates. So if by any chance you buy yourself a Norwegian rain jacket or a woolen blanket, fear not and ask the the saleslady if you can get tax rebates. You’ll have to hand-carry your item (or have them checked before checking them in; the person checking in should make some sort of mark on your receipt that the item has been checked in) because they usually look for it before giving you the rebate. I got a $22.41 rebate from a woolen Norwegian blanket. It helps make the shopping spree less guilt-inducing.

September 25, 2016 | Copenhagen, Denmark

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